Fix This: What’s that construction ‘eyesore’ on Friars Road?
A rail project construction site is shown on Oct. 7, 2019, on Friars Road near Morena Boulevard. (Natallie Rocha/inewsource)

Fix This: What’s that construction ‘eyesore’ on Friars Road?

This is the first installment of Fix This, an inewsource feature that invites the people who live and work in San Diego County to help power our reporting when it comes to fixing the region’s infrastructure issues.

Investigative reporter Mary Plummer is leading the effort, with assistance from interns and other inewsource staffers. You can help us by letting us know about everything from a pesky pothole at the end of your street to a fire hazard you spot in a park. Just email the team at FixThis@inewsource.org.

We’ll be following on your tips and posting answers in stories like this one. Your help could even be key to our next big investigation.

We are kicking off our Fix This coverage with a question from reader Peter Doft about a construction site on Friars Road.

“What’s going on with the portion of Friars Road west of the trolley tracks as you approach Sea World Drive. It’s been under construction for years yet no one is ever working there. A real eyesore.”

You can’t miss what Doft is asking about if you’re on Friars Road between Morena Boulevard and SeaWorld Drive. The road has been cut down to two lanes, with the other lanes used to store heavy equipment and stacks of construction material.

The reason for that “eyesore” Doft sees — the San Diego River Double Track project.

Construction workers are adding about one mile of railroad track from Tecolote Road to the Old Town Transit Center, replacing a decades-old rail bridge that crosses the San Diego River and building a light-rail line for the Mid-Coast Trolley.

Construction material for a rail project is shown on Oct. 7, 2019, on Friars Road near Morena Boulevard. (Natallie Rocha/inewsource)

The new railroad track will provide a second track to allow multiple trains to pass through the area. With the current setup, trains crossing the San Diego River bridge can’t pass at the same time.

The San Diego Association of Governments started building the $94 million double-track project in 2016 and expects it to be finished next August. Federal funds and the countywide half-cent TransNet sales tax are paying for the transportation improvements.

As for why Doft doesn’t see much construction work going on at the site, some of it’s done at night.

shadow-ornament

We'll let you know when big things happen.

About Natallie Rocha:

Natallie Rocha
Natallie Rocha is a reporting intern at inewsource. To contact her with tips, suggestions or corrections, please email natallierocha [at] inewsource [dot] org.